Eyes Wide Shut – Part 1: Micro-Sleeping

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Photo by Kenneth Webster

Last week, news broke about a train climbing an escalator in Chicago on the Chicago Transit Authority’s ‘Blue Line’. Below, are a few things that stood out for me from the initial investigation. In Part 2, I plan to dissect the below information and offer solutions to fighting Micro-sleep/Fatigue whilst on the job.

According to a few articles, the Driver had fallen asleep before entering the station and woke up just before the train hit the buffer stop. One of the investigators were quoted as saying: ‘The eight-car train eventually smashed into the bumper, apparently launching the train onto the platform. More than 30 people were injured.’

The investigator said a few key things, such as:

– The train was trying to stop
– The Driver was hired by the Chicago Transit Authority in April 2013. But she had become a qualified Conductor just 60 days before the crash (I assume by Conductor they mean Driver)
– She admitted to investigators that she had “dozed” off in February, too, and missed a station during that snooze. She was admonished for that lapse at the time
– The driver had a constantly changing schedule and had most recently worked Saturday night. On Sunday night, she had overslept and was late for her overnight shift.
– She was in the fourth of five round-trips to O’Hare when the crash happened at 2:50 a.m. Monday.

Investigators have previously said the train was traveling the correct speed as it approached the station. NTSB officials planned to gather more data from the transit agency before interviewing the driver again to determine what role fatigue played in the crash.

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Blue Line Diagram (Cropped) from Wikipedia

The full article can be read at: http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-nn-chicago-subway-driver-dozed-off-20140326,0,6672979.story#axzz2xizFVep0

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2 thoughts on “Eyes Wide Shut – Part 1: Micro-Sleeping

    • Absolutely abhijit. Though, I don’t think this always helps, there are many factors involved. We will be looking more in depth next week, thanks for commenting!

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